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Learning languages helps developing strong cognitive skills and social interaction
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Learning languages helps developing strong cognitive skills and social interaction

Learning languages helps in developing strong cognitive skills, in addition to improving social interaction and encouraging connection between others. This category covers books to help you learn various languages such as Cinyanja, Icibemba and Chitonga, as well as foreign languages.

Language acquisition is the process by which humans acquire the capacity to perceive and comprehend language (in other words, gain the ability to be aware of language and to understand it), as well as to produce and use words and sentences to communicate.

For example, if a baby hears the word “milk” often enough right before being fed from the bottle, he'll soon learn what that word means. If he always hears the word “ball” right before being handed a spherical object, he'll begin to associate “ball” with its referent.

Language acquisition is the process by which humans acquire the capacity to perceive and comprehend language, as well as to produce and use words and sentences to communicate. Language acquisition involves structures, rules and representation.

Language Acquisition is the ability to hear and speak the language and that acquisition is the foundation for a multitude of other skills such as vocabulary, writing structure and other text-based skills. In the primary stage, children go from babbling to learning 20 - 30 words using proper syntax.

Students learning a second language move through five predictable stages: Preproduction, Early Production, Speech Emergence, Intermediate Fluency, and Advanced Fluency

Researchers define language acquisition into two categories: first-language acquisition and second-language acquisition. First-language acquisition is a universal process regardless of home language. Babies listen to the sounds around them, begin to imitate them, and eventually start producing words.

The five stages of language acquisition are the pre-talking stage, the babbling stage, the holophrastic stage, the two-word stage, the telegraphic stage, and the multi-word stage.