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Sikhism, Sikhi or Sikh Dharma, is an Indian religion originated in the Punjab region
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Sikhism & Sikhs

Sikhism, Sikhi or Sikh Dharma, is an Indian religion originated in the Punjab region

Sikhism is a monotheistic religion, which means Sikhs believe there is only one god. Sikhs may also be called panentheistic, meaning that they believe God is present in creation. God is not the universe but is the life within it, its driving force. Sikhism, also known as Sikhi or Sikh Dharma, is an Indian religion that originated in the Punjab region of the Indian subcontinent, around the end of the 15th century. The baptism bequeathed by the tenth Guru, and who does not owe allegiance to any other religion, is a Sikh. Sikhism is classified as an Indian religion along with Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism. The basis of Sikhism lies in the teachings of Guru Nanak and his successors. There are three core tenets of the Sikh religion: meditation upon and devotion to the Creator, truthful living, and service to humanity. Sikhs are meant to uphold the values of honesty, compassion, generosity, humility, integrity, service, and spirituality on a daily basis.

Sikhism is an ethical monotheism fusing elements of Hinduism and Islam. It was founded by Nanak (1469-1539), a mystic who believed that God transcends religious distinctions.

Sikhism is a monotheistic religion. This means that Sikhs believe there is one God. One of the most important names for God in Sikhism is Waheguru (Wonderful God or Lord).

Drinking alcohol is often associated with the Punjabi culture, but is prohibited in Sikhism. Baptised Sikhs are forbidden from drinking but some non-baptised Sikhs do consume alcohol. Whilst the vast majority of those who do drink have no problem, a small number of Punjabi Sikh women are affected

Since 1699, about two centuries after the founding of the religion, Sikh leaders have prohibited their members from cutting their hair, saying long hair is a symbol of Sikh pride. The turban was conceived to manage the long hair and intended to make Sikhs easily identifiable in a crowd.

Kaur is a common name in the Sikh community. In a tradition that began more than 300 years ago, the name Kaur is given to every baptized female Sikh.

In this spirit, Sikh women and men maintain five articles of faith, popularly known as the five Ks. These are: kes (long, uncut hair), kara (steel bracelet), kanga (wooden comb), kirpan (small sword) and kachera (soldier-shorts)

According to Sikhism, death is a natural process, it's only the physical body that dies, and the soul lives on through transmigration and reincarnation. For them, the purpose of life is to move closer to Waheguru, the Sikh name for God, and that death will help break the cycle of reincarnation.

Among the Sikhs, the dastār is an article of faith that represents equality, honour, self-respect, courage, spirituality, and piety. The Khalsa Sikh men and women, who keep the Five Ks, wear the turban to cover their long, uncut hair (kesh). The Sikhs regard the dastār as an important part of the unique Sikh identity.